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LowellArts Gallery

May 11 to June 23, 2024

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Printed

Mostly Flora and Fauna: A Gathering of Linocuts

Artists

Martha Brownscombe

Jane Cloutier

Laura B DeLind

Sharan Egan

Ruth Egnater

Cindy Lounsbery

Woven

Interlacements - The Fine Art of Weaving

Artists

Boisali Biswas

Martha Brownscombe

Deb Cholewicki

Sharon Gill

Carol Irving

Carol Madison

Nancy McRay

Jasmine Petrie

Shanna Robinson

Turned

Creative Woodturning

Artists

Jeff Grill

Dave Kerley

Tom Sampson

Printed, Woven, Turned

Printed, Woven, Turned brings together 3 groups of artists, each group specializes in a specific medium - printmaking, weaving, and woodturning. The artist groups push the boundaries of their respective craft - the printmakers celebrate the boldness and spontaneity of linoleum prints, the weavers bring new perspectives to timeless techniques, and the woodturners explore current trends in sculptural wood art. The 3 groups feature a total of 18 artists from Michigan, and together they illustrate the versatility and diversity within these 3 artistic disciplines.

Gallery Hours May 11 to June 22: 

Tuesday through Friday 10:00am-6:00pm​

Saturday 12:00-5:00pm

Artist Reception:

Sunday, May 19, 2:00-4:00pm

This event is open to the public, light refreshments will be served.

The group of artists representing Printed presents an exhibition of works titled, Mostly Flora and Fauna: A Gathering of Linocuts. Six artists make up this group: Martha Brownscombe, Jane Cloutier, Laura B DeLind, Sharan Egan, Ruth Egnater, and Cindy Lounsbery.

The group of artists representing Woven presents an exhibition of works titled, Interlacements - The Fine Art of Weaving. Nine artists make up this group: Boisali Biswas, Martha Brownscombe, Deb Cholewicki, Sharon Gill, Carol Irving, Carol Madison, Nancy McRay, Jasmine Petrie, and Shanna Robinson.

​The group of artists representing Turned presents an exhibition of works titled Creative Woodturning. Three artists make up this group: Jeff Grill, Dave Kerley, and Tom Sampson.

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Printed

Martha Brownscombe
I have been a weaver and fiber artist for many years and became interested in Lino printing after taking a class from Laura Delind about five years ago. I find this medium to be quite compatible to use on fabric. I particularly like the boldness of the color contrasts and the textures one can achieve with linoleum printing. I am also attracted to the fact that is is such an egalitarian art form. The cost of materials is very minimal. Somehow that pleases me because as a weaver and fiber artist equipment is necessary, space devouring and costly. I love the freedom of just needing carving tools and a linoleum block.

Jane Cloutier
Jane Cloutier has been a botanical illustrator and a cut paper artist. In 2017 she started working seriously on printmaking, taking advantage of the wide range of possibilities offered by linocut.

Laura B DeLind
I have been carving linocuts for over 40 years.  Even after all that time, I am still fascinated by the interaction of positive and negative space, and charmed by the organic shapes and patterns that I find, most often in my own backyard.

Sharan Egan  
I am a multidimensional creative and draw on my background in textiles and stitch, printmaking and watercolor to create one-of-a-kind books (vessels) incorporating original artwork. I believe “everyone has a story to tell.” It is my hope that the vessels I create honor your unique story, however it might be told within the pages of your book. 

Ruth Egnater
Ruth Egnater was born in Detroit, Mi. She has been creating art since her first memories. Currently working as full-time printmaker she has been accepted to exhibitions and competitions in the United States and abroad.  Nearly all her prints showcase her passion for animals, nature, and often her sense of humor.

Cindy Lounsbery
I am a graphic designer and printmaker from Haslett, Michigan. My design background greatly influences my printmaking as I like to stylize or abstract images and mix different printmaking techniques to achieve what I want to say.

 

Printed

Mostly Flora and Fauna: A Gathering of Linocuts

The linocut (a form of block print) allows for bold, spontaneous images that highlight the interaction of positive and negative space. These are often accompanied by lots of energetic chatter (the marks created by the cutting tools). 

Each of the six artists exhibiting at the LowellArts Gallery uses the linocut as a point of departure for her own distinctive work.  But, despite their artful differences, their work shares a common spirit. It is inspired by organic shapes and images found in the natural world – its flora and fauna.  This shared inspiration, together with imagination and whimsy has resulted in the work displayed here. It is meant to be appreciated and enjoyed.  

Printed

Woven

Interlacements - The Fine Art of Weaving

Interlacements represents nine Michigan artists working in fibers. Brought together by a 2022 show at the Circle of Arts in Charlevoix, MI, we recognized a shared feeling woven throughout our pieces and decided to explore the synergies of showing together in new venues. Employing a variety of weaving methods both on and off the loom, our work explores the possibilities of tapestry weaving, shaft weaving and basketry methods. We work in two and in three dimensions using a wide range of materials to produce art that is connected by common themes such as nature, environmental concerns and cultural identity.

Woven

Boisali Biswas
Boisali Biswas, raised in India, is an award winning studio artist working in mixed-media fibers. Her formative years during BFA were spent at Visva-Bharati University, founded by Rabindranath Tagore at Shantiniketan. The profound experience through the educational journey has stayed with her, and continues to influence her work. She completed her MFA at Bowling Green State University. Living in this country for over 3 decades, and adapting to Western styles and inspirations in concert with her background has made her Art into a cauldron of multicultural assemblages that are unique and feast for the eyes.

Martha Brownscombe
Martha Brownscombe has an undergraduate and graduate degree in textile design from Michigan State University. Martha taught weaving and textile design classes in the Department of Human Environment and Design, and then the Art Department at MSU. Martha has been deeply involved in local, state and national institutions as teacher and lecturer. She has won numerous awards for her work. Martha has curated and co-curated a number of textiles exhibits at the Michigan State University Museum over the years She has served on the East Lansing Arts Commission for 10 years. Martha has also served as a jury for many exhibitions and shows.

"My work for this show revolves around the theme of a woven structure. I have been a weaver and fiber artist for over 40 years. I use the idea of woven structure in a variety of media. I like to create pieces with any number of materials, such as birch bark, steel, horsehair and many others. I have also become a printmaker, once again using the woven structure as the base, which is reflected in the resulting prints. I enjoy the challenge of incorporating different materials and media to create my art."

Deb Cholewicki
Deborah Cholewicki’s work reflects her love and passion for sculptural forms created from natural fibers. Inspired by nature – its bold colors, textures and movement, she incorporate unusual or unique finds (i.e. a funky piece of driftwood or a gnarly, twisted vine) and combine them with other natural plant materials (including willow, grapevine, inflorescence and yucca) to create her one-of-a-kind 2 and 3-D weavings. She also incorporates hand-spun/hand-dyed art yarns into each piece to create an even more impactful visual feast. 

"I have always been drawn to the beauty of nature - its grandeur, bold colors, varied textures, movement, and the strength of its fibers. Creating sculptural, organic forms that mimic these characteristics is what excites me, grounds me, and brings immense joy. Each of my works takes on a life of its own and always surprises me."

Sharon Gill
Sharon Gill is an avian ecologist and fiber artist in Kalamazoo, MI. Sharon is drawn to weaving because of the intimate connection between the materials and the maker, and the time and space afforded with the act of making. Sharon mostly uses natural materials in her weaving, finding these ground her to nature and place, and reflect the interconnectedness with and the unassuming beauty of the natural world.

"I’ve selected pieces that have a minimalist aethestic and show variations in form. Each begins with hemp warp, tying them together, but then diverge somewhat in shape, the fibers used in weaving (hemp, nettle, kudzu and linen), and scale."

Carol Irving
Detroit born, Carol Irving moved to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan at the age of 24. Before her move she had earned a degree in Botany, lived in New Mexico and then Oregon, and always had a love for Fiber Arts and Weaving. After taking an introductory class in weaving while in college she began to explore weaving on her own. Over the many years, she has fine-tuned her craft into an art. She has taken workshops from noted weavers including British Rug Weaver, Peter Collingwood. Her works have won awards in juried art shows throughout the US. 

"The process of weaving can be very meditative and grounding. Weaving is also very technical and mathematical, because it is so technical, I have to know exactly where I’m going before I get there. Weaving, using the interlacement of yarns, gives me an outlet to express myself that I haven’t been able to find elsewhere. My work is about ornament and texture, skilled labor, timeless beauty, and the inner spirit made visible."

Carol Madison
Carol Madison is a gatherer, grower and maker. Her baskets are a way of expressing those gathered possibilities. While she uses many different types of materials, the willow she grows is her main source for creating. So, for her growing, gathering, harvesting and processing are all part of the ritual that ends with a completed piece. 

Nancy McRay
Nancy McRay holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Michigan with an emphasis on Fiber Art. She has worked as a studio artist and community arts organizer since 1994. McRay is a member of the Greta Project: Growing Responsibility for the Environment Through Art. The group has produced three projects concerning Michigan invasive species”, climate change and social justice, and finally Michigan endangered species An award winning Fiber Artist, McRay’s current works are with Tapestry, Rigid Heddle Weaving and compound weave structures.

Jasmine Petrie
Jasmine Petrie is a weaver, natural dyer, zine maker, workshop instructor, loom doctor, DIYer, and artist in general. She resides in the forest of the Northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan. She strives to maintain a quality of life for herself and her family through her creations. She is a mother of two human children as well as goats, chickens, dogs, a cat, and a turtle. Fiber arts are her passion.

 

Shanna Robinson
Shanna Robinson makes art inspired by the natural world. Working in textiles, sculpture and printmaking, she creates a varied body of work connected by a love of nature. Concocting dyes and inks from plants, weaving with plant, animal, or reclaimed materials and making prints based on signature marks such as tree rings and fingerprints, she seeks to work in ways that connect her with the more-than-human world. She is a retired Professor of Art from North Central Michigan College, where she taught art history, design, textiles and ceramics. Robinson holds a BFA and an MFA from Eastern Michigan University. 

"Drawing from a mix of local materials, repurposed materials and commercially available materials, I seek to make things that feel familiar but cannot be identified, to evoke beings we might see in the wild but cannot place. I want to invoke a sense of recognition and also dislocation, to provoke more questions than answers. I hope that my work might burrow or fly or float, becoming something new to each viewer, causing them to rethink their place in the world, my reverence for the world will inspire that reverence in others."

Woven

Turned

Jeff Grill
Jeff Grill was an architect for over 40 years and dabbled in making wood objects for over 50 years. About 20 years ago he started using a lathe and turning wood quickly became his focus. In that time, he took many classes, turned over 1,000 bowls, and many other turned pieces. He and a good friend started the Grand River Woodturners Guild in 2010. He has entered wood turnings in many local and state-wide competitions including Festival of the Arts and four ArtPrizes.

Dave Kerley
David Kerley is local to West Michigan. Dave likes to use locally sourced green wood and incorporate other mediums like pine needle basketry and dry brush painting with woodturning to enhance the design of his pieces. He has active leadership roles in two West Michigan woodturning clubs and is affiliated with the Flat River Gallery and Framing of Lowell, Michigan.

Tom Sampson
Tom is a woodturner, furniture maker and sculptural artist.He spends considerable time outdoors and therefore tends to draw inspiration from nature and geology. He was first exposed to woodturning in his grandfather’s basement shop, who was a machinist by trade. Spheres and thinly turned discs are an attraction to him as turned objects. He is a current member and newsletter editor of the Grand River Woodturners Guild. He has shown art at numerous juried competitions including Festival of the Arts, Art Prize, and the American Association of Woodturners annual membership show.

Turned

Creative Woodturning

Woodturning is a form of woodworking using a lathe to shape wood. Utilitarian objects such as bowls, platters, and cups were a historical output of the process. Architectural elements including columns, ballisters, chair, and table legs were common mass produced items. The formation of the American Association of Woodturners in 1986 spurred a woodturning revival in the USA and a creative art form for woodturners. The turned objects in this exhibit showcase turned functional and sculptural objects from three turners in the West Michigan area.

Turned
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