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SOLO together

An exhibition of the work by 8 exceptional artists from Michigan

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Solo Together

June 26 to August 14

SOLO together is an exhibition of the work by 8 exceptional artists from Michigan. A body of work from each artist is on display that highlights the unique perspective of each artist. Artists include: Maggie Bandstra, William Davis, Sandra Hansen, Andrew Kline, Brenna Mahn, Susan Teague, Joan Tweedell, and Jeannette Woltmann. A wide range of styles and media are represented including: painting, photography, mixed media sculpture, metal sculpture, mixed media drawing, tissue paper collage, and woodblock prints.

Gallery Hours
Tuesday - Friday 10am-6pm
Saturday 12-5pm

SOLO together Artists

Maggie Bandstra

William Davis

Sandra Hansen

Andrew Kline

Brenna Mahn

Susan Teague

Joan Tweedell

Jeannette Woltmann

Artist Reception

Sunday, July 11, 2-4pm

Maggie Bandstra

1/4

Exhibition Title
Healing Garden


My artwork's unifying undercurrent plays with ideas and concepts surrounding trauma, beauty, nature, healing, and the human connection. The paintings I make are layers of dye, ink, acrylic, and oil paints that depict abstracted forms and colors found in flora. Exploring nature in this way signifies our layered human connection to the world and how we humans move through our lives. Creating beauty as I respond to the events around me is an honor and privilege during these stressful days. 

Maggie Bandstra

In 2021 Bandstra completed her M.F.A. in painting at Savannah College of Art and Design. Bandstra has a Masters in Educational Leadership from Michigan State University and a B.S. in Education from the Loyola University of Chicago. Her paintings are nature abstracted. Using an exaggerated scale, movement, and patterns to deliver a healing message through her work. She is encouraging us to take notice of the beauty in the world around us. The unifying undercurrent in Maggie’s work plays with ideas and concepts surrounding nature, healing, and the human connection.

William Davis

1/2

Exhibition Title

No Dark in Sight

Quality of light affects quality of life. Artificial light is collapsing natural darkness. When night looks like day, we have a problem. Using the Bortle Scale, I make images in overly lit terrestrial sites, which evidence the false promise of a post-industrial revolution– immersing the natural world with inventions that dismantle the biosphere. Trained to see light as an ally, I now call it a frenemy. That may sound abstract but is not absurd. It’s normal to fear the dark, but wiser to fear its absence because manufactured light is no hero and darkness is not the enemy.

William Davis

Bill Davis’ work is archived in over 25 museum or private collections in the U.S. and abroad. Davis managed Pavel Banka’s Prague studio and taught Photo History at Umprum (Usti) before receiving grants or fellowships to work in Las Vegas, the Amazon, Peru, Paris, Spain, Korea, Vermont, Michigan and exhibit in Athens, Kiev, Madrid, Edinburgh, Orange, Australia, Leeds, and Kiev. From 2016-2017 he was awarded the WMU Climate Change Teaching Grant, IEFDF, FRACCA, and a Sustainability Project Grant via the Milton Ratner Foundation to photograph light pollution. 

Sandra Hansen

1/3

Exhibition Title

Our Exquisite Pollution
 

When I became an environmental artist, I moved from oil and acrylic paint to, creating art with plastic bags and epoxy resin, to handmade paper. Abstracted water became the motif in my art, in the form of waves, bubbles, waterways, or the sea. My work became very large because of the enormity of the problem of pollution, Each art piece speaks to the beauty of water and the importance of caring for our water both in the abstract and in practice.

Sandra Hansen

Sandra Hansen is an international, environmental artist in many mediums. She is an optimist, and world traveler. The central theme of Sandra’s art embraces the beauty of water, despite being imbued with plastics and toxic elements. Hansen has exhibited, had artist residencies, visited art museums and galleries, and taught classes in thirty countries around the world.

Andrew Kline

1/3

Exhibition Title

Cold Steel: New Sculpture

I use materials which intrigue me - mostly industrial forms such as concrete, rebar, and I-beams. These materials are created by industry to be strong and true.  I enjoy the challenge of manipulating these materials - I find it empowering.  I strive to give these materials life.  My work is born from a dialogue between the materials and myself.  Decisions are made along the way regarding balance, symmetry, and rhythm, however, most of my work is made without any preliminary vision or inspiration.

Andrew Kline

My body of work began to develop at Western Michigan University while studying under professor Al Lavergne.  It's because of this relationship that I decided to explore the world of sculpture and pursue it as a career.  My work has been shown across the Midwest including throughout Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, and Pennsylvania.  My work can be found in public and private collections.

Brenna Mahn

1/3

Exhibition Title

This City Has an Undercurrent


Cities are places of structure and control, seen visually in the architecture of the city - the powerful lines of the buildings, the bridges that stretch across our rivers, and in the taming of the rapids, marshlands, and forests that make our cities possible. However, our cities have an undercurrent. The natural water flow has been thwarted but now flows underground beneath malls and homes and reemerges wherever it can in scattered parks and streambeds. Similarly, we still see signs of the natural landscape that was paved over to build the city; cattails and wildflowers grow in roadside ditches while trees and curated gardens thrive in neighborhoods.  These swirling waters and the flora resurfacing in unexpected places, encompassed in the atmosphere of faded sunlight struggling through fog- they represent the things we put off because we fear what facing them would do to our carefully constructed image of ourselves.

Brenna Mahn

Brenna Mahn graduated with a BFA in art from Calvin University. She draws inspiration from the rural landscape of the Midwest as well as from her travels and seeks to bring an unexpected perspective on the familiar in her art. Her work has been exhibited with the Ohio Art League, Light Gallery, Austen & Company, and published in Dialogue Magazine.

Susan Teague

1/3

Exhibition Title

Amazing Goddesses: You and Me Sister

“Amazing Goddesses: You and Me Sister” celebrates the contemporary Woman, validating her spectacular humanness as a champion in her own everyday story, and recognizing her core essence as a universal Goddess.  These charming and wittily named goddesses featured  in the exhibition are all made from colored tissue paper and glue.  No paint or other medium was used.

Susan Teague

Susan Teague’s professional career in the Creative Fine Arts spans nearly five decades.  Her art exhibitions have travelled throughout the United States, including Hawaii.  Most Southwest Michiganders know susan for her 8,000 plus square feet of painted murals at Bronson Hospital, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Joan Tweedell

1/2

Exhibition Title

Swan Song

Joan Tweedell has always been interested in the natural world, and birds in particular.

 

Joan Tweedell

After her 5 children had left the nest, she began a 40 year career as a potter, but  always remembered how much fun it had been to make block printed Christmas cards when the children were young. One day she tried carving a new block print, rediscovered what she should have been doing all those years, and never looked back. Now, at age 87, she is ready to leave printmaking, and find what the next chapter in life holds for her.

Jeannette Woltmann

1/2

Exhibition Title

Driving One of the Loneliest Roads in America, “The Dalton”

The James W. Dalton Highway, is a 414-mile gravel and dirt road, that stretches from the town of Livengood to Deadhorse at Prudhoe Bay through some of Alaska’s most remote wilderness. Our only companions during the trip on “The Dalton” was the Trans-Alaska pipeline running along the road, the long hauler trucks carrying cargo and muskoxen.  There were no gas stations, restaurants, rest stops, hotels, or any services beyond the Arctic Circle.  So, with our 2019 Chrysler Pacifica van loaded with sleeping bags, mosquito spray, plenty of food, a full-sized spare tire, and my camera gear we headed off to explore one of the most rugged and loneliest roads in America.

Jeannette Woltmann

Jeannette Woltmann is a storyteller and the camera is her medium.  She travels the back roads and wanders forgotten places for her landscapes and nature photos in America and Canada. Through the use of color, light and composition in her images, Jeannette provides a personal experience that encourages the viewer to see the world a little differently.